Heart to Tail Premium Adult Cat Food Indoor Formula

Aldi offers a small selection of products for dogs and cats, including dry cat food. Until recently, the store only sold larger bags of dry cat food weighing about 16 pounds. When I visited a newly built store a few weeks ago, I noticed two varieties of smaller 3.15-pound bags of dry cat food. One was a traditional formula and the other was a formula for indoor cats. I appreciate the smaller bags because we strictly control our cat’s portion sizes, and I worry a larger bag of dry food will go stale before we can use it all. I have always fed my cats Purina and had hesitations about feeding a generic brand, but I picked up the indoor formula cat food to try.

Heart to Tail Premium Adult Cat Food Indoor Formula

At around $2.50 for a 3.15-pound bag, the Heart to Tail food is a small cost savings compared to the 6.3-pound Purina bags I usually buy for about $7 to $9.

As far as what’s in the bag, the Heart to Tail package says it contains “balanced nutrition for adult cats” and includes “accents of garden greens” and a “natural fiber blend with wholesome grains.” It is made in the U.S.

I currently feed my cat the Purina Cat Chow Indoor + Immune Health Blend, and the ingredients lists for that and the Aldi indoor formula are similar. The first two ingredients are the same: corn meal and poultry by-product meal. Both brands include corn gluten meal, animal fat preserved with mixed tocopherols, powdered cellulose, phosphoric acid, salt, choline chloride, potassium chloride, parsley flakes, taurine, Vitamin E supplement, zinc sulfate, niacin, Vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, copper sulfate, and a few more things.

Some ingredient differences may or may not be significant. The Purina formula has soy flour while the Heart to Tail formula has soybean meal, for instance. The Heart to Tail formula also has some interesting ingredients such as rice bran, beef and bone meal, fish meal, and chicken liver digest that are not in the Purina Formula.

I found it interesting that the Aldi formula contains no synthetic colors, but the Purina formula has Red 40, Blue 2, and Yellow 5.

The back of the Heart to Tail bag instructs that, when switching to Heart to Tail Premium Adult Cat Food Indoor Formula from another cat food, you should allow 7 to 10 days for the transition. Do this by mixing “increasing amounts” of the new food with your cat’s other food until you are gradually feeding only the new food.

This was certainly good advice for our cat. We tried feeding her the Heart to Tail alone, but she only ate it under protest; she meowed and came back to us as if to say, “where’s the real food?” before finally giving up and eating it. Even when we mixed it, we had to be careful to put the Purina on top, since putting the Heart to Tail on top got a similar reaction. With time, she might come to accept the Heart to Tail, but there would definitely be an adjustment.

The Verdict:

Aldi’s Regular Buy Heart to Tail Premium Adult Cat Food Indoor Formula has similar ingredients to Purina Cat Chow Indoor + Immune Health Blend. My cat complained when offered the Aldi food instead of her usual Purina food, so she obviously noticed a difference, but she ate it with no apparent ill effects. The cost difference between Aldi cat food versus Purina food is small, though, so it may or may not be worth switching brands.

Save

Save

Save

About Rachael

Rachael is a freelance writer and editor. You can read more of her work at www.rachaelsjohnston.com.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *