Fremont Fish Market Tempura Shrimp

Earlier this year, I tried some tempura shrimp from Aldi’s cousin Trader Joe’s. I was impressed at how crispy the batter was and how flavorful the large shrimp were. Then, I recently found tempura shrimp at Aldi itself. I picked up a box to share with my husband for lunch.

Tempura is a Japanese cooking method that involves coating meat in a light batter made with water, flour, and sometimes egg. Then the whole thing is fried in oil. The frying process makes it fluff up with a distinct crisp texture that is different from western-style deep fried foods.

Fremont Fish Market Tempura Shrimp

Fremont Fish Market Tempura Shrimp cost $7.89 for a 16-ounce package at the time of publication. The package contains 12 oven-ready shrimp plus soy dipping sauce, which comes out to about 66 cents per shrimp. (Trader Joe’s tempura shrimp cost about 80 cents per shrimp.)

The Aldi tempura shrimp is Best Aquaculture Practices certified, and it’s a product of Vietnam. The shrimp were farm raised. (For comparison, the Trader Joe’s tempura shrimp are farm raised and a product of Thailand.)

The Aldi tempura shrimp is a Regular Buy, which means you should be able to find it at Aldi year round.

Ingredients for the shrimp include shrimp, water, wheat flour, soybean oil, cornstarch, modified food starch, rice flour, yellow corn flour, leavening, salt, and dextrose. Ingredients for the sauce include water, sugar, soy sauce, maltodextrin, modified tapioca starch, salt, and yeast extract.

If you’re watching out for allergens, this contains crustacean shellfish (shrimp), wheat, and soy.

Fremont Fish Market Tempura Shrimp

Fremont Fish Market Tempura Shrimp nutrition information and ingredients. (Click to enlarge.)

There are four 3-shrimp servings per container, and one serving plus 1/2 of the sauce packet will net you 200 calories, 8 grams of total fat (10% DV), 1 gram of saturated fat (6% DV), 65 mg of cholesterol (22% DV), 720 mg of sodium (31% DV), 26 grams of total carbohydrates (9% DV), no dietary fiber, 8 grams of added sugars (15% DV), and 9 grams of protein.

The box has instructions for baking in a conventional oven (recommended), baking in a convection oven, or deep frying. You could probably successfully air fry these, too, but I haven’t tried that yet.

To bake in a conventional oven, preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Place frozen shrimp 1 inch apart, with the underside of the tail facing up, on a nonstick baking sheet. Place the baking sheet on the middle rack of the oven. Bake for about 8-10 minutes on each side or until golden brown and crispy.

To bake in a convection oven, follow conventional oven directions except: preheat the oven to 375 degrees, and bake for about 7-9 minutes on each side or until crispy.

To deep fry, preheat vegetable oil to 365 degrees. Carefully place 4-5 frozen shrimp in hot oil. Fry about 3-4 minutes or until golden brown and crispy.

Microwave cooking is not recommended.

Fremont Fish Market Tempura Shrimp

Tempura shrimp, ready to eat.

These baked easily in my oven, and they were delicious. The shrimp are large, with plenty of airy, crispy breading. The soy dipping sauce is good, too. One family member who has a certain fondness for Long John Silver’s compared the breading to the fast food seafood chain. I’ll definitely be buying these again.

The Verdict:

Fremont Fish Market Tempura Shrimp bake up crispy. The shrimp are big, and the soy dipping sauce is a nice addition. If you like shrimp, these should be on your shopping list.

About Rachael

Rachael is the Co-founder of Aldi Reviewer. When she isn't busy shopping at Aldi, she enjoys cooking, gardening, writing gothic romance, and collecting more houseplants than she probably should. You can learn more about her at rachaelsjohnston.com.

2 Comments

  1. Not a fan of any seafood from a third world country with no regulations

  2. I buy these, and they’re great, however the box I just bought just recently we’re not the same! Tasted more like mushy fish sticks with crispy tempura batter. What happened? Cutting corners or faulty packing?

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