Aunt Maple’s Protein Pancake and Waffle Mix

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Pancakes are a favorite around our house, especially paired with sausage. My wife will sometimes make them from scratch, but we’ve also made them with Aldi’s outstanding all-purpose baking mix. The downside to pancakes is that they are full of carbs and, as a result, probably not as filling as they should be.

Enter protein pancakes, a recent trend in breakfast foods. Protein pancakes are popular among people looking to bulk up, but they are also potentially appealing to people who want more filling pancakes or who are looking for something a bit lower in carbs, like diabetics.

Aldi sells a protein pancake and waffle mix as an everyday Regular Buy. That means you can find it in stores all the time. One 18.5-ounce box cost $2.99 at the time of this post, which comes out to 16 cents an ounce. That’s more than standard pancake or waffle mixes but is less than many of the name brand versions of protein pancakes and waffles I see out there.

Aunt Maple's Protein and Waffle Mix

If you’ve made pancakes (or waffles) before, you’ll be right at home with the preparation instructions in this mix. To make it, you mix 1 cup of protein pancake mix with 2/3 cup of water, whisking it together. It will turn into a thick and slightly lumpy batter.

To make pancakes, you can scoop out the desired amount of batter and pour it over a 375-degree heated griddle that has been lightly greased with shortening or oil. The box doesn’t say what amount to use, but I went with 1/4 of a cup of batter per pancake, which made about 6 pancakes or so. The instructions say to cook the pancakes for 1 1/2 minutes on each side. I recommend keeping a close eye on the pancakes so they don’t burn on the outside.

To make waffles, you scoop out the desired amount of batter and pour it into a waffle iron. You then cook it for 2-4 minutes or until golden brown.

Aunt Maple's Protein and Waffle Mix

The primary protein ingredient in this mix is oats alongside wheat protein, and while the oat flavor isn’t overly strong, it’s present. If you absolutely hate oats you may not like these, but if you’re at least okay with oats they make a worthy pancake or waffle substitute. I found that if they’re heavily toasted on the skillet, the oat crunch can come through a bit, but otherwise the texture isn’t far off the mark for traditional pancakes.

In terms of ingredients, these do have fewer carbs than traditional pancakes, although they are by no means carb-free. They also contain a fair amount of protein, about 14 grams per serving. Ingredients include enriched flour, rolled oats, and wheat protein isolate.

Aunt Maple's Protein and Waffle Mix

Nutrition information and ingredients. (Click to enlarge.)

The Verdict:

Aunt Maple’s Protein Pancake and Waffle Mix makes for a good choice if you want protein-fortified pancakes or waffles. While more expensive than traditional pancakes, they cost less than name-brand protein pancake mixes, and the taste and texture aren’t bad, especially if you don’t mind a hint of oat flavor.


About Joshua

Joshua is the Editor-in-Chief of Aldi Reviewer. He is also a writer and novelist. You can learn more about him at www.joshuaajohnston.com.

One Comment

  1. However, the serving size on the box (1/2 cup) and the preparation instructions do not jibe. On the opposite side of the box that show nutrition facts it is indicated that if you follow the preparation instructions you will receive 14 grams of protein however, on the back of the box the prep instructions indicate using 1 cup of protein mix to 2/3 cup of water (would this not be 28 grams of protein and 440 calories)?

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