Crazy Candy Co. Fruity Chews

Aldi is king when it comes to imitating name-brand products. Inexpensive dupes of pricier products are all over at the discount German grocery store. Some of our favorites include certain cereals, tortilla chips, Hawaiian rolls, and frozen chocolate-covered bananas.

Lately, Aldi has taken to stocking some new name-brand imitations in the candy aisle. Aldi sells a few types of name-brand candy, including M&M’s, Hershey bars, and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups. Most of the candy at Aldi, though, is sold under several private labels. Chocolate is sold under the Choceur or Moser Roth private label, while most other sweets are sold under the Crazy Candy Co. private label. Most recently, we spotted Aldi versions of Skittles, peanut M&M’s, and Starburst.

Today, we’re taking a look at the Aldi take on Starburst candies. Starburst, originally called Opal Fruits, are a type of taffy made by the Wrigley Company, which is a subsidiary of Mars, Incorporated. The candy got its start in the United Kingdom in 1960, and the first flavors were blackcurrant, lemon and lime, orange, and strawberry.

Crazy Candy Co. Fruity Chews

At Aldi, you can buy a generic version of Starburst candy. Crazy Candy Co. Fruity Chews cost $2.49 for a 15.59-oz. resealable package at the time of publication. The candies are all individually wrapped inside the bag. The package states these are a product of Tunisia.

These are Regular Buys, which means you should be able to find them at Aldi any time of year.

Crazy Candy Co. Fruity Chews

A look inside the bag. The printed wrappers are a cute touch. 

Ingredients are sugar, glucose syrup, coconut oil, maltodextrin, humectant (sorbitol), citric acid, sunflower lecithin, natural and artificial flavors, ascorbic acid, colors (turmeric, anthocyanin, beta-carotene), and coloring foodstuff (radish, black currant, lemon).

These are in keeping with the Aldi commitment to avoid artificial colors. In contrast, name-brand Starburst contain artificial colors including red 40, yellow 5, yellow 6, and blue 1. So if you’re avoiding artificial colors, you may prefer the Aldi version.

Name-brand Starburst also contain gelatin, while these Aldi fruity chews do not contain gelatin, so that makes the Aldi candy ideal for people who eat a vegan diet. (Interestingly, Starburst in the United Kingdom does not contain artificial colors and is vegetarian.)

Crazy Candy Co. Fruity Chews

Nutrition information and ingredients. (Click to enlarge.)

One package contains about 15 six-piece servings. Six pieces contain 127 calories, 1.8 grams of total fat (3% DV), 1 gram of saturated fat (5% DV), 27 grams of total carbohydrates, and 20 grams of added sugars (30% DV).

Crazy Candy Co. Fruity Chews

Lemon-lime, orange, cherry, and strawberry fruity chews.

These fruity chews look a lot like Starburst. In terms of texture and taste, I think they are a little more like Airheads. Starbursts also seem to have a somewhat smoother texture compared to these Aldi fruity chews. Still, these Aldi chews taste good on their own merits. My family certainly liked them, and they didn’t last long in our house. The fact that they contain no artificial colors is a bonus, too. We still like Starburst a lot, but I wouldn’t hesitate to buy this Aldi version as well.

The Verdict:

Crazy Candy Co. Fruity Chews are an Aldi attempt to imitate name-brand Starburst fruit-flavored candy. They come close, but they’re definitely not an exact copy of Starburst. However, these Aldi chews have a few things going for them, including the fact that they contain no artificial colors. They also contain no gelatin, making them vegan-friendly. In contrast, Starburst contain both artificial colors and gelatin. While the Aldi fruity chews aren’t exactly the same as Starburst, we think they’re good on their own merits.

About Rachael

Rachael is the Co-founder of Aldi Reviewer. When she isn't busy shopping at Aldi, she enjoys cooking, gardening, writing gothic romance, and collecting more houseplants than she probably should. You can learn more about her at rachaelsjohnston.com.

2 Comments

  1. Well that’s absolutely fantastic because I rather buy something that is identical to what Europe gets plus I’m allergic to those artificial colors and flavors including corn syrup! So this is a pick me up👍🏻 The only problem I have not seen it in my area

    • They are pretty new to my local stores, so it’s possible Aldi hasn’t rolled them out everywhere yet. Hopefully you find them soon!

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