Countryside Creamery Sweet Cream Butter

If you do a lot of cooking at home, butter is often a staple component of many recipes. There are times when you might use a butter alternative, but nothing beats the taste of real butter. Whether you’re baking with it, spreading it on bread, adding it to the pan when you saute shrimp or veggies, or melting it to dip crab legs in, butter is delicious and indulgent.

Aldi sells several types of butter, including Irish butter and spreadable Irish butter. They also sell standard stick butter in salted and unsalted varieties. I typically use unsalted butter for baking projects and salted butter for everything else. Here, I’m taking a look at stick butter from Aldi.

Countryside Creamery Sweet Cream Butter

Salted butter on the left, unsalted butter on the right.

Countryside Creamery Sweet Cream Butter cost $2.69 on sale at my local store (with a full price of $3.69) for a 16-ounce package at the time of writing. This is a Regular Buy, so you should be able to find it at Aldi all year. These are both products of the U.S.

If you’re looking out for allergens, these contain milk. These are both certified kosher.

If you hang around on Aldi social media fan pages for long, you’ll eventually see discussions about Aldi stick butter and how the wrappers around each individual stick look identical to other brands of stick butter from other stores. Most people will also tell you Aldi stick butter tastes identical to other brands.

Each Aldi butter wrapper is printed with the plant number where it was processed. Most of the Aldi stick butter in my fridge had plant number 31-212 on the wrappers. When I plugged that number into the search feature on the website Where Is My Milk From, it gave me West Point Dairy Products in West Point, Nebraska. Some other Aldi stick butter in my fridge had plant number 49-34, which correlates to West Point Dairy Products in Hyrum, Utah.

The website for West Point Dairy Products indicates the company has three locations: West Point, Nebraska; Hyrum, Utah; and Richland Center, Wisconsin. Their About Us page states they were founded in 1947 in West Point, Nebraska, and they currently focus on producing butter for multiple private labels, including Albertsons, Safeway, Affiliated Foods (Shurfine), Jewel Tea, Kroger, and more.

I live in the Midwest, and it’s possible that Aldi customers living in other parts of the U.S. might have stick butter sourced from other plants. The best way to find out is to put the plant number on your stick butter wrapper into the Where Is My Milk From search bar. If you get a different plant, feel free to share with us in the comments below. Just keep our community guidelines in mind.

Countryside Creamery Sweet Cream Butter

Nutrition information and ingredients. Salted butter on the left, unsalted butter on the right. (Click to enlarge.)

The salted butter contains pasteurized cream and salt. It has 100 calories per 1-tablespoon serving, along with 11 grams of total fat (15% DV), 7 grams of saturated fat (36% DV), 90 mg of sodium (4% DV), and no carbs or grams of protein.

The unsalted butter contains pasteurized cream and natural flavorings. It has 100 calories per 1-tablespoon serving, along with 11 grams of total fat (15% DV), 7 grams of saturated fat (35% DV), and no sodium, carbs, or protein.

Countryside Creamery Sweet Cream Butter

Salted butter on the left, unsalted butter on the right. Note the plant numbers on the lower left corner of each stick. (Click to enlarge.)

As mentioned earlier, this butter tastes like other brands I’ve used, and it slices and melts as well as any other brand. I don’t buy any other stick butter brands unless I happen to be too busy to make an Aldi run and need to pick up butter at my nearest regular grocery store. I keep both the salted and unsalted varieties on hand so I’m ready whenever we want butter to spread on baked goods or whenever I need butter for baking. You can’t go wrong with this Aldi butter.

The Verdict:

Countryside Creamery Sweet Cream Butter comes in salted and unsalted varieties that are good for everything you need real butter for, from baking projects to spreading on your toast. The stick butter in our local Aldi stores is sourced from a couple of West Point Dairy Products plant locations, which specialize in producing butter for multiple private labels for common grocery retailers such as Kroger, Albertsons, and Safeway. This Aldi butter is as good as any name brand, and for a fraction of the price.

About Rachael

Rachael is the Co-founder of Aldi Reviewer. When she isn't busy shopping at Aldi, she enjoys cooking, gardening, writing gothic romance, and collecting more houseplants than she probably should. You can learn more about her at rachaelsjohnston.com.

10 Comments

  1. I’ve always found it odd that the blue package has red individually wrapped sticks and the red package has blue individually wrapped sticks.

  2. It’s mostly recommended that you purchase Land o Lakes because their fat content and flavor is ideal for cooking.
    Oddly, I’ve found Aldi’s to be my favorite because it tastes good and melting it in the microwave oven never seems to pop and splash like LoL’s.

  3. I am going to try the soft butter on my next trip, it’s what we use in the summer with such a hot kitchen most of the time. Tje price is so much lower than any soft butter elsewhere.

  4. We’re in NY and our butter wrapper is stamped plant #55-360. The whereismymilkfrom.com website can’t find that code but a web search says it’s from Foremost Farms USA cooperative in WI (https://www.foremostfarms.com).

    Interestingly, I searched the plant # of our Aldi milk and it comes more locally from CT.

  5. Thanks for this information. In my former home, populated by thrifty rural folk on limited incomes, the Aldi butter I bought a couple of times tasted stale. I guessed that sales were so low that the butter stayed too long in the case, and I went back to supermarket butter. Now I’m in an urban area with a larger more diverse population and think that turnover in Aldi butter may be more brisk. So I’ll try it again.

    • We’re also in a metropolitan area with quick product turnover in our local Aldi stores. The butter definitely doesn’t sit long on the shelves.

  6. Thank you. Good information to know about where the products originate from.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *